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EDIBLE FLOWERS

Yes!!...There are flowers that have been used for edible purposes viz., cooking, aromatic drinks, wines and spirits throughout history, including a recipe in the earliest surviving cookbook by the Roman Apicius for brains with rose petals.
Some of the edible varieties include herb flowers, cloves, capers, roses, safflower, violets, chrysanthemum, nasturtium, marigold, jasmine, hibiscus, dandelions, ratafia; orange, peach, plum and squash blossoms; red poppy, hyssop, mimosa, lemon flowers, garlic flowers, forget-me-nots, primula, lotus blossoms, primrose, honeysuckle, pinks, daisys, rocquette flowers, fuchsias, carnations, chive flowers, pansies, gladiolus, tulips, yucca, hollyhock, bean blossoms, mustard flowers, and elderflower.
But, since there are poisonous flowers as well, don't try the flowers you are not aware of. Further, don't eat flowers from a florist. Many florist served flowers are pesticide-sprayed .
Nasturtiums are one of the most widely recognized edible flowers. Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus), are grown worldwide, both as garden flowers and for culinary uses. The brilliant yellow, orange or red flowers and peppery flavored leaves are used in salads. The flowers may also be chopped and used to flavor butters, cream cheese and vinegar; the immature flower buds and seed pods may be pickled and used like capers.
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