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GLORY OF THE SNOW

glory of the snow
GLORY OF THE SNOW

Glory-of-the-Snow (Chinodoxa) is a beautiful flower which looks wonderful in rock gardens, under trees and mixed in among other miniature Spring bulbs. In light shade they can bloom up to 3 or 4 weeks. The name Glory of the Snow is derived from the Greek words chion, meaning snow and doxa meaning glory.

Kingdom
Plantae
Division
Magnoliophyta
Class
Liliopsida
Order
Liliales
Family
Liliaceae
Genus
Chionodoxa

Glory-of-the-Snow is best suited for cold weather. It peeks out in the coldest weather to welcome Spring. There are up to 8 to 10 1 inch flowers to each short 6 inch stem, in a sparkling violet-blue with a white center. There are two or three slender basal leaves per bulb, with a single flower stalk no taller than about 6 or 8 inches. They grow in forests and on mountains, and bloom in early summer as the last snows melt.

  • Racemes of star-shaped flowers appear above linear, mid-green, basal leaves. In milder climates, they bloom earlier than in their native habitats, in early spring.
  • Chionodoxa Glory-of-the-Snow is so-named because in some climates it blooms early enough that it pokes its little bright blue six-petalled flowers right out of the snow.
  • This appealing Glory-of-the-snow plant can be grown in rock gardens, raised beds or troughs, or under shrubs or trees where they can spread. They self-seed freely.
  • Chionodoxa is closely related to, formerly categorized as a Scilla.
  • These are the natives of western Turkey, and were first described in 1877.
  • Glory of the the Snow plant needs a Gritty and well-drained soil with full sun.
  • Plant bulbs 1 - 3 inches apart, 3 inches deep in to the soil.
  • Chionodoxa forbesii is generally free from pests and diseases.
  • Sow seed in containers in a cold frame as soon as ripe. Remove offsets in summer.
  • Plant them in early Fall. Glory-of-the-Snow do not need much care after they are planted, usually after sowing seeds they slowly spread in the garden.
  • The bulbs rot when using fertilizers excessively high in nitrogen or fresh manure, wet soil conditions, or by poor quality, bruised or cut bulbs.
  • Keep the bulbs safe from few insect or disease problems.
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